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Wednesday, July 5, 2017

The Untried Solution to North Korea

Kim Jong-un enjoys his role as "supreme ruler" of North Korea and wants to secure it by amassing nuclear power to intimidate his rivals and enemies: South Korea, Japan China, Russia, and the US.

Surrounded by military and political leaders, Kim Jong-un is not alone in his role.

Kim Jong-un would undoubtedly wish that his legacy is one that ensures a better way of life and security for his nation.

The obstacles to his success in the free-world include:

1. His form of government.
2. His style of leadership.
3. His lack of desire to assimilate as a participant in the free-world.

Could anything change his mind albeit twisted as it is?

What if Kim Jong-un can be assured of a personally splendid life without fear from enemies?

Is it possible to present a slate and schedule of changes that he leads and implements such that he and his people are rewarded for measurable progress?

Otherwise, the downside risk of annihilation remains, yet what about presenting a believable and practical path with a positive outcome?

That is diplomacy. That is dealmaking of the type Donald Trump promised.

There Is a Peaceful Way Out of the North Korea Crisis 
Kim Jong Un’s nuclear and missile programs represent one of the most dangerous challenges since the end of the Cold War. But there are opportunities to stop them.
A North Korean navy truck carries a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father, Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, on April 15, 2017.  
A North Korean navy truck carries a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father, Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, on April 15, 2017. Damir Sagolj / Reuters 
LARRY DIAMOND  APR 26, 2017   
https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/04/north-korea-trump-china/524349/



Image: Damir Sagolj / Reuters

1 comment:

  1. The Chinese and Russians want to increase trade with North Korea in the belief that greater economic dependency will improve the chances for successful diplomacy and reduce military tensions.

    Did that work with Hitler? Did it work with Bashar al Assad, Saddam Hussein, and the like?

    ReplyDelete